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Keynote Lectures

Software Similarities and Clones: A Curse or Blessing?
Stanislaw Jarzabek, Bialystok University of Technology, Poland

Formal Requirements Modeling and Verification for Critical Systems
Régine Laleau, Université Paris-Est Créteil, France

Subjective Databases
Alon Halevy, Facebook AI, United States

Digital Innovation and Transformation to Business Ecosystems
Kecheng Liu, Henley Business School, University of Reading, United Kingdom

Available Soon
Domingo Ribeiro, Universidad de Valencia, Spain

 

 

Software Similarities and Clones: A Curse or Blessing?

Stanislaw Jarzabek
Bialystok University of Technology
Poland


Brief Bio
Stan Jarzabek has been working on techniques for software reuse since 1997. His team developed XVCL (XML-based Variant Configuration Language), a variability management technique for software reuse in 2000. Since then, XVCL has been applied in lab studies and industrial projects with results published at major software engineering forums (a study of redundancies in Buffer library with XVCL won ACM Best Paper Award; industrial projects with XVCL were published at ICSE and FSE). XVCL later evolved to a more flexible system called ART (Adaptive Reuse Technique) http://art-processor.org. Stan’s long-term research interest is software engineering (software reuse and maintenance), and in recent years mHealth – use of mobile technology to improve delivery of healthcare. Stan received MSc and PhD from Warsaw University. He has been a Professor at Bialystok University of Technology since 2015; in 1992-2015 he was an Associate Professor at the Department of Computer Science, National University of Singapore; in 1990-92 he was a Research Manager of CSA Research Ltd in Singapore. Before, Stan taught at McMaster University, Canada and worked for industrial research institute in Warsaw.


Abstract
Similarities are inherent in software - Who has not adapted existing code to speed up writing new programs? While simplistic and not be very effective in long run, copy-paste-modify is a common reuse practice. It produces software clones - recurring in variant forms similar code fragments, classes, source files or even bigger program modules. Software cloning phenomenon has been investigated by researchers for decades. Whether clones are good or bad depends on the context. Sometimes software clones hinder program understanding and maintenance, and are considered a sign and measure of decaying software structure and quality. Such software clones should be avoided or eliminated, whenever possible. In other situations, software clones are created intentionally and play some useful role in a program. Application of company standards and design patterns leads to clones, but we do not question the value of these practices because of that. In the talk, I will analyse the multifaceted phenomenon of software similarities, particularly focusing on the situations when software clones - not necessarily good - explode because we can’t contain their explosion with conventional programming techniques.
Software systems can comprise 10’s of millions LOC (WINDOWS is well over 100 millions LOC), with thousands of inter-related components, reaching the limits of what today’s technology can handle. We’ll be surely challenged by even larger and more complex systems-of-systems of the future. How do we cope with such systems if their complexity grows proportionally to their size? Especially software maintenance, which is almost exclusively done at the level of code, exposes developers to such complexity. Not surprisingly, up to 80% of software costs go to maintenance. I will present a view that software similarities have yet unexploited potential to help us reduce software complexity. But to tap on that potential we must reach beyond the current software reuse paradigm.

 

 

Formal Requirements Modeling and Verification for Critical Systems

Régine Laleau
Université Paris-Est Créteil
France


Brief Bio
Régine Laleau is full professor at Université Paris-Est Créteil since September 2003 and member of the team 'Specification and Verification of Systems' of the LACL (Laboratory of Algorithmic, Complexity and Logic) laboratory. She was head of the LACL laboratory from June 2008 to December 2016. She is also associate professor at Université de Sherbrooke (Québec) since 2002. From 2013 to 2018, she was chair of INFORSID, an association for francophone researchers in information systems and since 2015, she is chair of the Requirements Engineering working group of GDR GPL (Research Group on the Engineering of Software and Languages). She was member of the computer science section of the French National Board of Universities from 2012 to 2019 (in the board since 2015). Her research is in the field of information systems, software engineering and formal methods. It includes the coupling of formal methods and semi-formal ones, combination of formal methods for the specification of systems, functional security in information systems and requirements engineering. She has supervised several PhD students and currently supervising two PhD students. Since 2003, she has published papers in more than twenty international journals and fifty international conferences. She has worked and currently working on several research projects. She has been serving as PC member for several international conferences in information systems, software engineering and formal methods.


Abstract
The raising complexity of critical systems is obviously observed in most industrial domains like automotive, aeronautics, space, energy, medical, etc., challenging all systems, software and hardware engineering. A simple rule says that the sooner a problem is identified in the development, the better it is for the success of the project, its costs, time delivery and residual default rate. That is why requirements engineering (RE) is getting higher responsibility in the development of such critical systems. RE, always, has to manage some tradeoffs between methods, languages, models and tools to capture well the initial goals defined in a natural language and the need to produce a clear, complete, unambiguous model of the specification for design and implementation phases. On the other hand, when developing a critical system, formal methods are used to strengthen the development process and to increase the level of confidence of the final product. However, up to now, RE activities (including requirements verification and validation) are mostly human-based and subject to errors.
In this keynote talk, we will introduce some of the challenges surrounding the modeling and verification of requirements for critical systems and we will describe recent developments in the use of formal methods for these activities. Then, as an illustrative example, we will present the results of the FORMOSE project which aims at developing a formally-grounded and model-based RE method for critical systems.

 

 

Subjective Databases

Alon Halevy
Facebook AI
United States


Brief Bio
Alon Halevy joined Facebook AI in August, 2019. Until December, 2018, Alon was the CEO of Megagon Labs where his team focused on developing AI for well-being. Before that, Alon led the Structured Data Research Group at Google for 10 years. Previously,  he was a professor of computer science at the University of Washington, where he founded the database research group. Alon is a founder Nimble Technology, and of Transformatic, Inc., which was acquired by Google in 2005. He is the author of "The Infinite Emotions of Coffee" and co-author of "Principles of Data Integration". Alon is an ACM Fellow, received the Sloan Fellowship and the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) Award. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 1993 and his bachelor’s degree from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.


Abstract
Online consumers are constantly seeking experiences, such as vacations, restaurant outings and exciting jobs in order to improve their well-being. However, e-commerce search engines only support searches for experiences to a very limited extent -- you can search on the objective attributes of a service (e.g., hotel price and location), but the experiential aspects are buried in online reviews. E-commerce sites make some effort to surface comments from reviews, but users can still not specify experiential aspects (e.g., romantic hotel in a quiet Mediterranean town) in their queries. There has been considerable work in the NLP community to recognize and extract subjective text, but that’s only the first step towards querying.
To address this challenge, we introduce OpineDB, a subjective database. OpineDB is based on a data model that carefully balances the richness and bottom-up nature of natural language and the top-down design principles of databases. OpineDB is able to answer queries that combine multiple subjective conditions and aggregate subjective data. Unlike a traditional database system, there may not be a 1-1 mapping between query terms and the database schema. In some cases, OpineDB needs to find the closest attribute (or combination of attributes) that answers a user query, and in some cases it may have to fall back to retrieval directly from the review text.
Joint work with Yuliang Li, Jinfeng Li, Vivian Li, Aaron Feng, Saran Mumick and Wang-Chiew Tan from Megagon Labs.

 

 

Digital Innovation and Transformation to Business Ecosystems

Kecheng Liu
Henley Business School, University of Reading
United Kingdom


Brief Bio
Kecheng Liu is a full professor and holds a chair of Applied Informatics in Henley Business School, University of Reading, United Kingdom. He has got 27 years of teaching and research experience in universities in UK and China in addition to his10 years of working experience earlier in the Chinese Academy of Sciences. His research interests span from organisational semiotics, informatics in business, business processing modelling, alignment of business and IT strategies, digital leadership and transformation, and big data analytics and AI for healthcare. During his career, he has become a distinguished academic by leading, designing, developing and delivering academic courses and programs. He is a recognised top researcher by producing research works and playing leading role in international research communities. He has contributed to commerce and industrial sectors in UK, EU and China in a variety of forms and roles such as advisor, consultant, academic lead and principal investigator.


Abstract
Digital technologies have been penetrating every aspect of business. Such pervasive deployment of digital technologies enables organisations to reinvent themselves in defining and conducting business. Leveraging the value of information as the key resource, through digital innovation such as digitisation and servitisation of products and services, becomes necessary for a business to survive and to remain competitive. Business ecosystems of the organisations and their partners have been formed through digital connectivity and digital platform which offer clearly strategic advantages and competitiveness. Interconnectivities between entities in the ecosystem are realised through multiple flows such as goods, finance and information. For a business organisation to gain competitive advantages, a successful transformation of the organisation in many dimensions are essential to allow value co-creation with other members in the ecosystem. These dimensions include mindset, culture, values, leadership, structure, process and IT systems. This keynote will discuss the notions of digital innovation and transformation, and the prerequisites and readiness for the transformation towards business ecosystems. By examining the current practice of successful examples, key findings will lead to the principles and models of organisational transformation for value co-creation and optimising benefits in the business ecosystems. This keynote will hopefully inspire practitioners and researchers to benefit from existing theoretical lenses and methods, and to derive their own guidelines and models to support organisations in digital transformation.

 

 

Keynote Lecture

Domingo Ribeiro
Universidad de Valencia
Spain


Brief Bio
Available soon.


Abstract
Available soon.

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